R
O
A
D
A
B
L
E



T
I
M
E
S













Defining the Challenge Page 3




Previous Next



Control Systems


Control systems in autos and aircraft are markedly different.

Aircraft are controlled in three axes - roll, pitch, and yaw - and the most common control system to manage these requirements is a wheel on a yoke. The wheel is rotated to the right or left to control roll about the axis through the length of the aircraft. The pilot pulls or pushes on the yoke to control pitch, so that a push forward moves the nose down, a pull back pitches the nose up. Yaw, which is movement to the left or right, is controlled by the rudder pedals. In normal flight, however, an aircraft is turned by using inputs in all three axes. Usually it is gently rolled to the left or right, causing induced yaw. The rudder pedals are then used to co-ordinate the turn. In addition the pilot may pull back on the yoke to keep the nose up. In a sharp turn, the pilot may add a fouth element of control by adding power, to compensate for the loss of lift when an aircraft is rolled sharply.

The only directional change available in a car is yaw and this is achieved by turning the steering wheel.

YawPic


PitchPic RollPic

Pitch may be induced in the car by directing it up or down a hill. Roll may be induced by directing the car along the side of a ditch.





A dual purpose vehicle must have all of the capability required by a car and an airplane. It is desirable to achieve this without having the floor of the machine cluttered with controls. The thought of having a gas pedal, a brake pedal, two rudder pedals, and perhaps a parking brake pedal at the drivers feet is a very unpleasant prospect.









_ _ _ _ _ _


PREVIOUS
PAGE
HOMEPAGE
RESOURCE CENTR
ALPHALIST
INTEGRATED
MODULARS
VTOLS
CARMOVIE
CHALLENGE
NEXT
PAGE