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The Chrysler Corporation VTOL

Model VZ-6CH

Chryslervtol


In 1957 the U.S. Army Transportation Research Command called for tenders from U.S. industrial companies to provide utility vehicles capable of vertical take-off and landing for use in observation, liason and combat duties. They were to be operated at very low altitudes of 5 to 12 feet, and were intended to be used over terrain such as swamps, lakes and rivers that would be inaccesible to regular land vehicles. Operating speeds of approximately 70 mph were envisioned, desired payload was 1000 pounds, and flight endurance was to be several hours.

The VZ-6CH was the submission of the Chrysler Corporation. Without wings or rotors, the machine was to obtain lift from two three-bladed fixed-pitch, ducted propellers, each of 8.5 foot diameter. They were powered by a single Lycoming engine providing 360 shaft horsepower. Two sets of hinged control vanes were mounted below the propellers to produce roll and yaw control. Pitch was to be controlled by inlet vanes mounted at each end of the aircraft above the propellers. The landing gear consisted of four castored landing legs, one on each side and one on each end.

In its first tests the machine was tethered from below. It appears that it had ample power to obtain the desired lift. However, control was inadequate and the machine crashed on its first flight when only secured by a loose tether from a crane. The pilot suffered a scraped elbow but the craft was beyond repair. The Army stopped financing the program and nothing remains of the ill-fated attempt.


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