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Urban Aeronautics


The "X Hawk"

urbanaeroxhawk


urbanaeroxhawk Images Copyright - Urban Aeronautics, Ltd.

Urban Aeronautics of Tel Aviv, Isreal is developing a vertical take-off and landing aircraft called the X-Hawk. This machine is configured as a tandem-fan, turbine powered vehicle with a center section to house the crew compartment and payload bay. Maximum payload is 1700 lbs including the pilot and 9 seated passengers (calculated at 175 lbs per person). The payload bay can also be configured to serve as a medical rescue cabin.

Urbanaero does not consider the X-Hawk to be a "flying car". Rafi Yoeli PhD., President & CEO of Urban Aeronautics Ltd. stated, "It is designed to comply with existing FAA standards and uses helicopter and aircraft equipment (engines, propellers, systems) exclusively. X-hawks will supplement helicopters in roles requiring operation inside obstructed terrain such as cities. They will first be used for rescue, policing, fire departments and EMS (air ambulance) and subsequently -- for private transportation as well. While future, low cost "Flying Cars" could be derived from this technology, X-Hawks will be flown initially by rated pilots (probably helicopter pilots) and operate next to helicopters in existing fleets."


Some Of The Outstanding Features Of The X-Hawk

The lift fans will be operated using variable pitch rotors and a rather complex system of multiple vanes. The multiple-vane control system has been granted a U.S. patent and will consist of four separate layers of independently movable vanes in each duct. There will be two layers at the top and two layers at the bottom of each duct. These can be co-ordinated to provide effective lift or side forces. Fore and aft movement is controlled by fully reversible variable-pitch thrusters connected to twin turbine engines.

In addition, the pilot will use a "fly-by-wire" multi-channel flight control system and an automatic stabilization feature to help control the aircraft and maintain level flight. These features will simplify the pilot's workload, allowing him to concentrate on the kind of precise piloting that is required in situations such as rescue missions at high-rise apartments and offices. The vehicle will be fully FAA certified. Even with a full payload, the X-Hawk can still come to a safe landing after the loss of one of the turbines. Another interesting feature calls for the X-Hawk ducts to be acoustically treated to reduce noise levels. This will help overcome one of the major criticisms of some powered-lift VTOLs, namely excessive noise.



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